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‘’Totoministri’’, Italian Canadians eligible for a spot in the Liberal Cabinet

TORONTO – The ‘’totoministri’’ in Ottawa is snapped and the Italian Canadians ask for space in the new cabinet. While Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is busy with the delicate task of filling all the boxes of the future Government, the Mps of Italian origin elected in the ranks of the Liberal Party are pressing for a spot in the Cabinet. However, it must be taken into account that at the federal level the formation of a new executive represents a long and troubled birth, a complicated interlocking operation in which the prime minister must take into account numerous factors: geographical representation of the provinces, gender, ethnicity, religious belief and obviously merit, ability and political experience are some of the most important elements that can determine one choice instead of another, in the difficult attempt to achieve a balance between all the components. 

A total of nine deputies of Italian origin are elected in the Liberal Party. Among these, who seems to have an armored role is Anthony Rota, outgoing Speaker of the House and author of the historic speech in Italian at the House of Commons after being elected president of the House of Common. His confirmation in the prestigious and authoritative role seems obvious.

David Lametti, re-elected in the district of LeSalle-Emard-Verdun, Minister of Justice since January 2019, will once again be part of the government team. Lametti inherited this position from former MP Jody Wilson-Raybould, managing with great skill the ministerial portfolio previously invested in the SNC-Lavalin scandal.

The same goes for Filomena Tassi, re-elected in the district of Hamilton West-Ancaster-Dundas with 44.3 percent of the preferences (27,845 votes) and the third parliamentary experience. In the last legislature Tassi was Minister for the Elderly before being promoted to Minister of Labour. He will still be part of the government, potentially with a greater role in the executive.

Marco Mendicino is also looking for reconfirmation in the Cabinet. The former prosecutor, in the House of Commons since 2015, in the last legislature held the role of Minister of Immigration, a post he could keep.

Also looking for a Cabinet post is Francesco Sorbara, who in the last legislature held the role of parliamentary secretary to the Minister of Revenue. After the defeat of Deb Schulte, Sorbara’s chances – as a leading representative of the entire York Region – are clearly uphill.

Difficult, at least on paper, that Judy Sgro can enter into the Cabinet. Re-elected in the Humber River-Black Creek constituency, in parliament since 1999, with Justin Trudeau Sgro has never had any office within the executive: her last presence in the government dates back to the two-year period 2003-2005.

Finally, we have three liberal deputies elected in the metropolitan area of Montreal ready for the big leap in the federal government.

Angelo Iacono‘s chances are increasing, still elected in the district of Alfred-Pellan with 47.8 percent of the votes, a constituency he has represented continuously since 2015. In the first two legislatures Iacono did not have any government office, this could be the right time.
And the doors of the Government could also open for Patricia Lattanzio, elected in the electoral college of Saint Leonard-Saint Michel, a result that doubles the victory of 2019, with 29,000 votes, equal to 69.4 percent. In the second legislature, Lattanzio is in pole position for a weighty place in the executive.

Francis Scarpaleggia also has some hope of promotion. For the Liberal MP, in parliament since 2004, it will be the seventh consecutive legislature: for now he has never held positions as a minister.

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